Home > Saving The Planet

So how do we help?

What can we do to help to fight the climb of greenhouse gasses in our one and only small little planet? We are all concerned about how much really can one person’s actions affect this global phenomenon. Can I really make a change?

Well, we are more than 6 billion single persons on this planet and hopefully, it is not only you that is taking an action. Some of us are executives in large multinational companies that can affect decisions regarding use of energy and resources.
If some of these executives are on our side (sorry, our “planet side”), we can, and we will make a change!

Following are ideas for actions and habits you can start with.
Don’t jump too quickly into deep water. Start slow and after a while some of these steps will become a second nature for you.

 

Please click one of the subjects to view related ideas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great ideas regarding Transportation

 Displaying ideas 1 to 3 from 3 about this subject

Vehicles

Use vehicles that run on clean energy. The cleanest being your body energy. Go for a walk, ride a bike or skates.
You will save money on transport and on health as your fitness increases.
Next in line will be electric vehicles and motorcycles.
If you have no choice and need to use non-electric motorized vehicles then try to car pool with others or use public transport.

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Driving Sensibly

Save fuel and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by avoiding acceleration quickly when you drive. Car engines are not efficient when under stress of acceleration or high load.
If you drive sensibly, your car's gas emissions will reduce and along with your fuel bill.

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Maintain your car

Save money on your fuel bill and save the environment by regularly checking that your tyres are inflated to the correct air pressure and your air and fuel filters are clean.
This will also reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

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